Home Forums Robert Wyatt Shipbuilding Wyatters delights (what are you listening to?)

This topic contains 339 replies, has 43 voices, and was last updated by  zeebras 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • #1746

    theallgolden
    Participant

    btw max: neil young’s first album is one of my all time fave albums. after buying ‘decade’ in the seventies and becoming a neil young fan this was one of my first ‘original’ neil young albums i bought (the other was ‘comes a time’ and i have similar feelings to this album). i love every single song on this album. nearly twenty years later after i bought ny’s first album i felt in love with the music of van dyke parks. and if you take a close look on neil youngs first album it sounds a bit van dyke parks like, or?

    #1747

    theallgolden
    Participant

    and btw once again: isn’t it , ah, strange that a real flood of posters came around just beacuse to win a cd. materalistc world it is….

    #1845

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    @theallgolden wrote:

    btw max: neil young’s first album is one of my all time fave albums… i love every single song on this album.

    For me the arrangements are uniformly strong, however the core material is variable in quality. There isn’t enough lyric bite to many songs, with excessive repetition (a generic problem with popular song) dulling them. Still, as I said, I’ve finally accepted that this album is a keeper – and there is no Neil Young opening I prefer to the power chords of ‘I’ve Been Waiting For You’. Such a wonderful visceral urgency that is perfect for the lyrics!

    #1846

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    @theallgolden wrote:

    and btw once again: isn’t it , ah, strange that a real flood of posters came around just beacuse to win a cd. materalistc world it is….

    There are hundreds of people, thousands world-wide, who sacrifice part of their never-to-be-repeated life listening to radio pap so that they can ring in on the slender promise of either free movie tickets or a CD single… What a failure of the imagination!

    I’m delighted this album is out there, in the big badlands, and I’ll buy it. Cash is not quite the equivalent of sweat but it is one measure of honest labour.

    #1852

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    The Who: ‘Thirty Years of Maximum R&B’

    “Play some rock’n’roll – what do you think that was, Mantovani?”

    This 4CD box set is so earthy that even its quirks (a 15 second track?) are worthwhile. I intend to listen for the next thirty years.

    #1853

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Steely Dan: Pretzel Logic (1974) – They never made a better album, with later work (even the guitarfest of ‘The Royal Scam’) bordering on mannerism. Here the arrangements fizz like vintage champagne, the jokes are not overly opaque, and the whole is greater than the parts.

    #1856

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Pink Floyd: ‘The Division Bell’ – This is an excellent forgery. It’s as if the back catalogue was mashed up by a computer. The sequencing is strong, the texture perfect, yet only Richard Wright (Lazarus back from the dead) brings the essential scent of being human.

    #1861

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    On my 51st birthday I’ve reversed the digits and am playing one of my favourites from the teen years: ‘Close to the Edge’ was released by Yes in September 1972. After decades of punk-induced prejudice I’m now able to hear it again. You know what? Never mind the Sex Pistols, here’s the bollocks.

    #1862

    theallgolden
    Participant

    first of all: happy birthday, max.
    yes, yes! four years younger as you, but with the same prejudice i sold so many so called prog-rock albums in the eigthies. pink floyd, genesis and yes as the most prominent bands were the first ones with which i made some peanuts. that was a fault (maybe,but without selling that stuff i would not have bought other treasuries). i bought some of that vinyl again. one of my favourites as a teen was yessongs. it is a kind of early speedmetal album. o.k. the music has nothing to do with speedmetal, but the power with which they played their songs thereon reminds me always to this genre. still a thrill!

    #1866

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    @theallgolden wrote:

    one of my favourites as a teen was yessongs. it is a kind of early speedmetal album. o.k. the music has nothing to do with speedmetal, but the power with which they played their songs thereon reminds me always to this genre. still a thrill!

    ‘Yessongs’ is a powerhouse album that survives less than perfect field engineering in order to slam you against the wall. All my ill-advised scorn has vanished before the burning mercury of this music.

    But today I listen to Dennis Wilson: ‘Pacific Ocean Blue’ (1977) – It’s gritty but with mica flecks that shine in the noon sun. Wonderfully worn.

    #1867

    theallgolden
    Participant

    what a wonderful description of dennis wilson’s album.

    i didn’t bought many new albums this year, but after listening to a song of les vampires meets zola jesus i had an attack of enthusiasm and -without hesitation – i ordered there ep on vinyl. a dark, haunting experience. imagine you listen to the cocteau twins, colourbox and mark stewart and mafia at one time. this is what cames to my mind immediately. a short six song droning flush.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gU5OgfLV … re=related

    #1884

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    I’ve been revisiting the records of Frank Zappa, whose brilliance is not often lyrical. His words do not resonate the way his music does because they are teen-male ingratiating (not ‘I love’ but ‘I fuck’) – yet his melodic writing is rarely ingratiating the way most pop songs are. Reuben & the Jets is his most respectful tribute to popular song. I hear Zappa’s cock-rock lyrics, however satirical the presentation, as a failure of the intelligence that distinguishes his instrumental writing. His dictatorial friend Captain Beefheart is more successful at quality control, uniting worthy parts into a convincing whole.

    The Mothers of Invention (1965-69) represents Zappa’s best period for balance. These early albums are also more satirically effective than his 70s-80s releases, where smut rather than sex is a distraction. He refuses to write about sex with tenderness, in part as an over-corrective to the mush that is popular romantic song.

    The late records either forget about words or else, as in Civilization Phaze III, collect them in intercalary tracks that are easily (and thankfully) skipped. So my favourite releases gather at one or other end of a long career if a short life:

    1) Absolutely Free
    2) Burnt Weeny Sandwich
    3) Weasels Ripped My Flesh
    4) Hot Rats
    5) Civilization Phaze III
    6) The Yellow Shark

    #1889

    zeebras
    Participant

    i’m old enough that i became a zappa fan while the mothers of invention were still together. as i’ve mentioned elswhere, my first concert was zappa and the mothers.
    i consider all the mothers albums to be essential, and they remain my favorites of the zappa discography. from the mutant blues/r & b of freak out! to the electric chamber rock of uncle meat and burnt weeny, the music continues to amaze and inspire to this day. zappa always dismissed the mothers and their work, but i think it’s these recordings that cemented his reputation as a musical iconoclast.
    so imagine my surprise (and great disappointment) when i first bought the fillmore east june 1971 album. there was an inkling of things to come on chungas revenge, but i sure wasn’t prepared for this. where were the long instrumentals, the intricate overdubs and tape splices, the saxes and bassoons? sadly, replaced by some sort of vaudevillean, smut-infested juvenilia. i’m no prude, but i felt like i needed to bathe after listening to this. i do like the 200 motels soundtrack and movie, but the flo and eddie period is the low point for me.
    i think there were other high spots. the waka/jawaka and grand wazoo records were a welcome return to form, and the band with george duke, ruth underwood, chester thompson and the fowler brothers gave the mothers a good run for their money, sort of zappa’s equivalent to miles davis’s second great quintet.
    although he always had ultra-talented musicians in his bands, the smutty lyrical content seemed to be the main focus, and, for me, that was always tiresome and trite.
    to max’s list, i would add the following:
    lumpy gravy
    we’re only in it for the money
    waka/jawaka
    the grand wazoo
    imaginary diseases ( a great archival release of the petit wazoo)
    roxy and elsewhere
    one size fits all
    studio tan
    orchestral favorites
    the lost episodes

    #1891

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Good to get some recommendations, Zeebras, tomorrow I intend to buy ‘Lumpy Gravy’.

    Sunday morning belongs to early Rod Stewart, before the stars in his eyes caused musical myopia. ‘Every Picture Tells a Story’ and ‘Never a Dull Moment’ are as precious as memories of messing with the girl-next-door at the local gravel pit.

    Rockin’ Rod does a lot more than rock; it’s the folk elements that enchant me, and a more adventurous approach to roots music (think about what Beefheart does with the blues) might have made these recordings timeless rather than capsules of the early seventies. Still, what a voice! It’s impossible not to share Jeff Beck’s admiration.

    #1896

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Scott Walker: ‘3’ & ‘4’

    Listening, I feel like a small boy who watches his sister enter adolescence. It’s as if the spirit of Lou Reed took possession of Barry Manilow. And it’s fantastic.

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