Home Forums Robert Wyatt Shipbuilding Wyatters’ Delights III (what are you reading?)

This topic contains 36 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Max_Gate 10 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #1279

    theallgolden
    Participant

    Georges Perec: Life, the Users Manual

    j.

    jaako, this is a fantastic book. one of my favourites.

    i am just reading music magazines at the moment. the next book on my list is

    #1280

    greystone
    Participant

    I have to ask Max Gate what is wrong with narrative? I always thought that the need to tell stories was one of the things that made us truly human. Am I naive?
    During a long convalescence recently I was amused by the Jaspar Fforde ‘Thursday Next’ series-Lost in a Good Book etc and also by Andrea Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano series. I have also been rereading John Clare and thinking how much his concerns should be our own really

    #1281

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Greystone, welcome to the forum. Sure, telling stories appears to be a distinctively human activity; as such it’s a strength rather than a weakness. If you re-read my post about fiction you’ll see that I’m rarely interested in hearing the story more than once, which is rather different from not wanting to hear the story at all:

    ‘Over Christmas I revisited Denton Welch’s ‘In Youth is Pleasure’; it is one of the few novels I’ve read more than once. Generally fiction’s dependence on narrative stops me from reopening the covers.’

    Most novels are propelled by narrative and therefore in thrall to it. Once my curiosity to find out what happens has been satisfied it, naturally, vanishes. So only rarely does a novel have such depth of characterization and show sufficient subtlety of prose technique to tempt me back, and those works that do are usually ‘classic’ because they balance all aspects of the genre – although occasionally a perverse work which excels in one aspect to the (near) exclusion of the others manages it (eg. the works of Samuel Beckett).

    #1282

    theallgolden
    Participant

    john einarson – mr. tambourine man, the life and legacy of the byrds’ gene clark.

    i am a fan….

    #1283

    iBee
    Participant

    Chomsky “Underderstanding power”. I’m bored with fiction…

    #1284

    theallgolden
    Participant

    holiday time. travel time. thousands miles away from home i sweat and read. marggrave of the mashes. the german translation of the john peel book. and it dissapointed me a bit. i think depending on the kind of the spelling style which isn’t the best. but neither john nor sheila are writers, so i should not be too harsh with them. and at the end i had a lump in my throat.

    #1285

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    There’s a sentimentality that masquerades as pragmatism in much of ‘lifestyle’ journalism. To John Peel’s credit, he was not nostalgic, nostalgia being the most common incarnation of sentimentality. And yet…the failure to establish context results in hyperbole, which is marketing’s version of sentiment. And mass media is the prime offender here – whereas fine writing requires an analytical ability that is beyond the populist commentator: syntax is the algebra of thinking.

    #1286

    Paul_AM
    Participant

    the Shadow Line

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