Home Forums Robert Wyatt Shipbuilding Wyatters’ Delights II (what are you viewing?)

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  • #376

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    By far the most popular topic in this forum is the one where we share which recordings we have been listening to; in consequence I’m adding three splinter topics:
    – What are you viewing? This is for recent film and exhibition experiences;
    – What are you reading? Share your private pleasures without risk of prosecution;
    – Where have you been? Not an existential question, rather an opportunity to tell us about travel.

    As time permits I’ll post teasers for each topic. Since this one is about the visual, let me simply say:

    Mike Leigh – Naked: one of the darkest comedies I have laughed through (sometimes happily, more often not); the verbal gymnastics of the script are matched by the grimy visuals.

    Max Gate

    #1300

    iBee
    Participant

    “Clean” by Olivier Assayas (2004).
    The story of a rock-star girlfriend who tries to get off the drugs, find back the child she left behind and eventually start to record something.
    Sounds melodramatic but it’s not. Great cast (and the most subtle Nick Nolte you can think of) and a very sharp directing.
    Try to catch it when you can! 8)

    #1301

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Ibee writes: ‘Great cast (and the most subtle Nick Nolte you can think of)’

    Nick Nolte has developed into an accomplished character actor. He was a convincing Adam Verver in the unfairly neglected Merchant-Ivory adaptation of Henry James’ The Golden Bowl – and you have to understand nuance to deliver dialogue borrowed verbatim from James. Since then I’ve regarded his name on any poster as an attraction.

    #1302

    zeebras
    Participant

    i’ve been having a mini aki kaurismaki film festival here in the basement. “the man without a past” “the match factory girl” “ariel” and “drifting clouds”. aki is the pride and joy of finland, and is probably responsible for the majority of cinematic work coming out of finland. he reminds me very much of hal hartley: both use a stock company of actors, a dead-pan delivery of lines, and great use of music.
    some other films i’ve been watching:
    “donny darko”
    “high fidelity” – this reminds me of my days working in a cd shop.
    “ghost world”
    “it conquered the world” – great ’50’s sci fi cheeze.

    #1303

    iBee
    Participant

    I had the chance to watch many films of Aki Kaurismaki in France and i really enjoy every one of them. To add to this list above, my favourites are also La Vie de Boh?

    #1304

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    I haven’t seen Kaurismaki’s films. Here, in the margins of civilization, I’ve been spending the early evenings in darkness; so, why not put it to use by viewing DVDs? And the principal director on show over the last week is John Cassavetes, whose claustrophobic dramas contrast with the immense star canopy outside my window. ‘Woman Under the Influence’ is scarifying stuff – so many moments of recognition amongst such chaos.

    Max Gate

    #1305

    iBee
    Participant

    My fav’ Cassavetes is Love Streams (his last one but the first one i saw), it’s like a sum of anything he ever said (but cannot be resumed in words anyway). It was impossible to find for a long time but was released in dvd in France recently. I’m also waiting for a release of Husbands, another great one starring Cassavetes, Gazzara and Falk in complete free-style ;D

    #1306

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Courtesy of some impulsive DVD buying (thank God for irrational impulses to part with money) I’ve been viewing the films of Bela Tarr. The immense ‘Satan Tango’ is a godless cross between Andrei Tarkovsky and Samuel Beckett. I can’t adequately praise it because I’m stunned into silence after the last disc of its 4 DVD set spins to a stop. Instead here’s critic George Robinson, writing for ‘The Jewish Week’, on its briefer successor:

    Tarr… is the director and co-writer of a series of stubbornly difficult, magnificently rewarding films about the grim aftermath of the fall of communism in his native Hungary. Working in a highly nuanced, vividly textured black and white, Tarr uses very long takes, slow, elegantly gliding camera movements and elliptical, minimal but often poetic dialogue to create a picture of a dead-end world of drunks and xenophobes, no-hopers trying to deal with an unrecognizable social landscape in a dreamlike rural world. He does so while leaving enormous ambiguities intact in his narratives, which tend to be as minimalist as his films?

    #1307

    zeebras
    Participant

    this weekend past, i ventured out to the neighborhood cinemas and saw two films of very differing quality.
    first up was a documentary entitled “feel the sound”. this is about scottish percussionist evelyn glennie, who also happens to be deaf. a lot of the action centers around a recording session with fred frith in an abandoned warehouse in germany, but we also see her playing with musicians in japan and new york city. the music is great (especially the stuff with mr frith), and there is a real spiritual quality to this film and this woman. as she says at one point in the film “we need to eat, we need to sleep and we need music”. quite the gal.
    from the sublime to the ultra-ridiculous, the following day i went to see “king kong”. what a bloated piece of s hit this is. surely in this day and age there is a better use of 207 million dollars than this. more proof that classic films don’t need to be re-made.

    #1308

    Jaakko
    Participant

    Dario Argento

    Can dvd

    j.

    #1309

    zeebras
    Participant

    we finally entered the 21st century in this household and bought a dvd player. i’ve been revelling in the slew of classic film noir now available:
    nightmare alley (1947)
    the street with no name (1948)
    whirlpool (1950)
    the sweet smell of success (1957)
    and some more recent paranoia thrillers:
    the conversation (1974)
    seconds (1966)

    #1310

    Max_Gate
    Participant

    Much to my son’s disgust I have no interest in home theatre, so we watch on an aging 21″ television with an equally antique VHS player and DVD player stacked on top. Genuine surround-a-roma transistor sound! The idiocy of this arrangement is reinforced by our choice of films:

    Roger Waters: In the Flesh, Live – I’m enjoying an unexpected surge of interest in matters Floyd, having not been able to listen to them since my teens. And I prefer Waters performing his own (Floyd) songs to Dave Gilmour et al wandering through the sonic corridor Waters opened when he left twenty years ago. This is that rare combination: authentic and stadium.

    Sonic Youth: Corporate Ghosts, The Videos – Taken in small doses these are ragged and inspiring; watched end to end they get tedious, with the adolescent visuals preventing the trance like effect you get hearing the albums.

    From the ridiculous to the sublime….

    Ingmar Bergman: The Seventh Seal – ‘humourous’, ‘moving’, ‘iconic’; these are all inadequate terms that beg more questions than they answer so let’s settle for ‘wonderful’.

    Max Gate

    #1311

    zeebras
    Participant

    more 40’s film noir:
    fallen angel
    the house on telegraph hill
    he walked by night
    and some neo-noir:
    blue velvet
    l. a. confidential
    i also picked up baby snakes by frank zappa. this is pretty much a waste of 2 hours 44 minutes. bruce bickford’s clay animation is pretty amazing, but even it gets a little tedious after awhile. i guess i’m just not the zappa fan i used to be.

    #1312

    theallgolden
    Participant

    i watched the ‘capote’ film. a good one.

    #1313

    theallgolden
    Participant
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